Stoker—224–No Sparkling Allowed!

Heather

Mother, knitter, spinner, writer, wife, weaver, host...not necessarily in that order...

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7 Responses

  1. Pam Haswell says:

    Heather, while I see the caleche picture that you have in the show notes when I do a Google search, I don’t think that one is the typical vehicle. The caleches used for tours of Old Montreal are like the majority of the images that I found– the driver sits on a raised seat just behind the horses and the passengers are in a lower section behind him. This configuration is more in line with the idea that upper class passengers wouldn’t be sitting in the same area as the “working class driver, and it makes a lot more sense to me as I listen to the text.

    I’m slowly catching up – only 2 1/2 years behind now!

    • Heather says:

      More like this?
      I can see what you mean about why that style fits better. I wonder why these images weren’t coming up first on my searches back in 2011?! Thank you for clarifying!

  2. Was the jerky recipe an online thing? Or did you find it in a book? I would love to try making some..

  3. Kimberly says:

    Try this website – http://historymyths.wordpress.com/category/death-by-petticoat-book-2/
    the “having ribs removed” myth is Myth #28

  4. Laurel says:

    When you mentioned the surgery, I was certain I had heard of such a thing in my reading. I was trying to find more info, but I don’t even recall for sure where I had read it. I had read all of Louisa May Alcott’s writing, and I know in one of her books, there is a decrying of the fashion of corsets. At times, feminists can be over sensitive, as women are the ones promoting the fashion, not men. At one time, some men even wore corsets. Women today are getting there pinky toes removed to better wear those awful pointy toed shoes. I don’t think men find that attractive!
    Here is one link that I’ve found that busts some of those myths. Of course, how authentic is this person’s writing? She does present a decent bibliography. http://www.clotheslinejournal.com/victorian.myths.html